Explore 360

Everest

via the South Col

  • Where?

    Nepal

  • Altitude

    8,848m

  • Duration

    59 days days

  • Weather

  • Physical

    P7

  • Technical

    T6

  • P7 - You will be pushed physically to the limit and then beyond. Long and arduous preparation is required before this expedition. Expect to be carrying pack weights up to 25kg. Be prepared for very long, sustained days with hours well into double figures on a regular basis. Discomfort to achieve your goal is to be expected.

    Visit our Grading Information page for a full overview.

  • T6 - Expect punchy sections of more technical rock climbing or prolonged Alpine climbing at Scottish Winter III or Alpine AD. Good skills on rock or ice is paramount.

    Visit our Grading Information page for a full overview.

  • Overview

  • Date & Prices

  • Pics & Vids

  • Itinerary

  • Kit List

  • FAQs

Overview

Mount Everest, 8,848m. Emotionally overwhelming, consuming exhilaration mixed with utter relief, the knowledge that for a few minutes you have the entire planet beneath your feet. To stand on the summit of Mount Everest is to be on top of the world in every possible meaning of the term.  For all climbers it is the magnificent achievement, a crowning glory in a lifetime of adventure.

Mt. Everest is an exciting but serious undertaking meant for climbers with prior experience at altitude and sound climbing skills. Not for the faint hearted, it is a potentially dangerous mountain that requires a significant amount of time climbing in the ‘Death Zone’. Rolfe Oostra and 360 Expeditions are honored to have teamed their expertise with Mike Hamill (Climbing The Seven Summits)  to offer you an unparalleled opportunity to climb Mt Everest.

In order to marginalize the risks faced by every Everest climber, we focus huge amounts of energy on strategy, planning our every move on the mountain in minute detail. We work with lightweight oxygen systems, state of the art equipment, a refined acclimatization schedule, the best weather forecasting available and employ a phenomenal Sherpa team to ensure our clients have the greatest opportunity for success.

360 and CTSS are offering 7 different price packages for climbing Everest, please read the full FAQs for all the options.

Find out more
Everest, via the South Col Everest, via the South Col

Date & Prices

For private trips or bespoke itineraries inc. different dates, please contact the 360 office on 0207 1834 360.

A monthly payment plan is possible, please contact the office to chat through the options.

For private trips or bespoke itineraries inc. different dates, please contact the 360 office on 0207 1834 360.
A monthly payment plan is possible, please contact the office to chat through the options.

Departure & Return

Duration

Price (excl. flight)

Price (incl. flight UK-UK)

Start: 01 April 2021
End: 29 May 2021

Price without flights:  $62,995

The price quoted here reflects the Western Guided Team option.

360 and CTSS are offering 7 different price packages for climbing Everest, starting from $44,995. Please read the full FAQ’s for all the options.

01 April 2021

29 May 2021

59 days

$62,995

N/A

The price quoted here reflects the Western Guided Team option.

360 and CTSS are offering 7 different price packages for climbing Everest, starting from $44,995. Please read the full FAQ’s for all the options.

Included

  • No min group size, guaranteed to run
  • 3 nights at the Yak & Yeti Hotel in Kathmandu (2 before and 1 after)
  • 8 bottles of Oxygen per climber plus mask and regulator
  • All food whilst on expedition, Lukla to Lukla
  • All camping equipment except that noted in the kit list
  • All mountain related permits for climbers and Sherpas
  • All Sherpa wages, insurance and associated costs (except tips)
  • All accommodation whilst on the trek
  • All local transfers and internal flight to/from Lukla
  • 15% discount at Cotswold Outdoor
  • Monthly payment plan, on request
  • For all the inclusions and exclusions please see the FAQs under the expeditions package that you are booking. All packages can be found under our FAQs

Not Included

  • International flights
  • Any significant change to local pricing from 2020 – 2021 such as increasing the permit price, VAT / tax will be passed over to the climber. We do not envision this
  • $600 must be give to the Sherpa tip pool so we can cover their summit bonus
  • Personal equipment
  • Medical and personal high-risk insurance
  • International air ticket
  • Tips for western guides
  • Items of a personal nature; phone calls, laundry, room service, alcoholic beverages etc.
  • Any additional costs associated with leaving the expedition early
  • For all the inclusions and exclusions please see the FAQs under the expeditions package that you are booking. All packages can be found under our FAQs

Pics & Vids

Itinerary

DAY 1 : Arrive Kathmandu

The initial phase of your ascent of Mount Everest is subject to minor changes depending on flight arrival and departure times, weather, group dynamics and fitness and so on, but the itinerary outlined provides an excellent indication of the trek and what you will experience.

This itinerary is only a rough estimate and will be determined by weather and acclimatization. This is adventure travel so the schedule will likely change and not everything will go as planned. People need to be adaptable and positive.

We recommend that people arrive in Kathmandu one day early to avoid travel delays or issues with lost baggage. Additional costs (hotel/food/sightseeing) for this extra day are the client’s responsibility. Please let us know if you want us to arrange logistics for you arriving early or if you would prefer a single room option.

DAY 2 : Obtain Climbing permits/ Free Day/ Team dinner

Today is all about preparation for the expedition ahead with a comprehensive briefing by your Everest leader and a full kit check. Any additional items needed can be bought locally in a number of shops that we can recommend. Dinner in Kathmandu.

DAY 3 : Fly to Lukla and trek to Phakding (2,610m)

A flight to Lukla, from where we begin our trek into the Khumbu region. The views from the plane are amazing, providing dramatic scenes of terraced hills and the distant Himalayan giants. After landing we meet our ground crew and begin a 3-4-hour trek to Phakding, our night’s resting place.

DAY 4 : Trek to Namche Bazaar (3,400m)

We continue trekking along the banks of the Dudh Kosi, crossing this roaring river on exciting suspension bridges laden with prayer flags. After entering Sagamartha National Park, the trail climbs steeply with breath-taking views to Namche Bazaar, the gateway to the Khumbu region.

DAY 5 : Rest and acclimatization in Namche

Today is an acclimatisation day in Namche Bazaar. Namche is the Sherpa capital and a bustling settlement crammed with markets and traditional Sherpa houses. Optional hike to the Sherpa museum from where we can see views of Mt. Everest, Lhotse (the 4th highest peak in the world) and the beautiful Ama Dablam.

The rest of the day is yours to relax and wander around checking out the shops and amazing bakeries.

DAY 6 : Hike to Tengboche (3,860m)

Today we begin by trekking along the contours of the hills. Our route takes us to Tengboche, the spiritual centre of the Khumbu with its famous monastery. We will explore the monastery and might catch a glimpse of monks performing Buddhist prayers and rituals. We are spoiled by another well-known bakery situated at the end of the village offering great treats.

DAY 7 : Rest and acclimatization in Tengboche

A well deserved rest and relax in Tengboche.

DAY 8 : Hike to Pheriche (4,300m)

We continue along the roaring glacial waters of the Dudh Kosi with magnificent views of the mountains. We cross another suspension bridge on the Imja Khola, and climb to Pangboche amongst thousands of Mani stones. From Pangboche the route winds high above the valley floor, passing through various Sherpa settlements until 5-6 hours later we reach our resting place for the next couple of days, Pheriche.

DAY 9 : Rest and acclimatization in Pheriche

This is a day to acclimatise and allow our bodies to adjust to the rarefied atmosphere now we have gone above 4,000m. There is the option of a 3-4 return hour climb up a nearby hill (5,050m) for a view of the spectacular 6,000m peaks of Tawoche, Cholatse, Island Peak and the 8,000m wall of Lhotse. On a clear day we may see Mount Makulu, another giant above 8,000m and the 5th highest mountain in the world.

DAY 10 : Hike to Lobuche base camp

From Pheriche the trail traverses through alpine meadows and follows a glacial stream, continuously overlooked by the magnificent spires of Tawoche and Cholatse (both 6,000m peaks). We will stop in Dzugla, (4,570m), for lunch before continuing along the lateral moraine of the Khumbu Glacier. Today we pass by the stone memorials to climbers who have died on the mountains around us. Look carefully to find touching memorials to famous mountaineers. We follow the trail to Lobuche base camp (aprox 4,800m) and stay just below the terminal moraine of the tributary glacier. Camping tonight.

DAY 11 : Trek to Lobuche high camp (5,800m)

An early start sees us begin our ascent of Lobuche. The route crosses glacier moraine and involves a number of short scrambles up rocky steps.  Camping tonight.

DAY 12 : Lobuche high camp – contingency day

In case of bad weather.

DAY 13 : Rest and acclimatization above high camp

Rest and acclimatization above high camp. Today we do a recognisance climb to the start of the fixed line and let our bodies adjust to the rarefied air of 5,000 meters and above, the altitude of EBC.

DAY 14 : Summit (6,119m) and descend to Lobuche base camp

Today we’ll be gunning to the top of one of the most spectacular trekking peaks in the Khumbu valley. Our route skirts alongside a glacier on a rocky ridge before traversing a steepening snow slope up to the summit ridge. This part is the most spectacular section of the climb as the views of many familiar mountains in both Tibet and Nepal open up to us. We will be using fixed lines to help ascend the trickier sections (PD+) and will descend back down to Lobuche base camp.

DAY 15 : Trek to Everest base camp (5,346m)

We get our first look at what will be our home for the next six weeks. Everest Base Camp is situated on the Khumbu glacier at high of 5,346m. All  Mount Everest climbers and their support teams, including us when we come back from our Lobuche ascent, assemble here for their Everest attempts. A bustling temporary tented village just for the short climbing season where we can feel a real sense of excitement and anticipation.

The route will already have been fixed by the Ice Doctors through the icefall who then manage the route to summit until the end of the season. Our own rotation/ acclimatization phase commences when we have had our Puja ceremonies at EBC and the Ice Doctors and Sherpas are happy to head higher up.

DAY 16-17 : Rest and acclimatize

Rest and acclimatize at EBC.

DAY 18 : Train and acclimatize

Training day; today we will start to brush up on ladder crossing techniques, using ascenders and basic glacier travel in a safe area of the Khumbu icefall.

DAY 19 : Rest and pack for first rotation

Rest and pack for first rotation.

DAY 20 - 30 : Rotations/ Pumori camp one and acclimatisation phase of expedition

In order to achieve maximum acclimatization, become familiar with the route and to improve efficiency at crossing ladders, ascending fixed line and glacier travel we will be climbing steadily higher up the mountain before our summit push. Each rotation involves a few days of physical activity but is coupled with a few essential days of rest in between.

On our arrival to EBC we should already be acclimatized to the altitude of EBC from climbing Lobuche East and having spent several nights sleeping at 5,000m.  In addition, to improve our acclimatization but minimize the time spend in the Khumbu icefall we will also ascend to Pumori camp one during this phase of the expedition. This day in itself is a unique addition to this itinerary.

Having entered the Khumbu icefall on a number of occasions, to train and to get familiar with it, our first rotation will take us to Camp 1 (6,000m) for one night and then onto Camp 2 (6,400m) for two nights. We then head back down to EBC and rest.

The second rotation will see us heading up a little higher via nights at Camp 1 and 2, to Camp 3 on the Lhotse Face at 7,400m from where we descend to EBC for slightly more oxygen and much needed reboot.

Loss of appetite, periodic breathing, nausea and headaches are all common symptoms of your body adjusting to the rarified air of altitude. It is important to note that some climbers take slightly longer to acclimatize than others and that these symptoms lessen and ultimately disappear once full acclimatization is achieved. Your guide and Sherpa team are on continuous standby to monitor your acclimatization process and to enhance your personalized ascent strategy.

Continues…

DAY 20 - 30 cont'd : Rotations/ Pumori camp one and acclimatisation phase of expedition

In order to allow for the most efficient natural acclimatization climbers endeavor to stay off supplementary oxygen for as long as possible and generally only begin using O2 once we head above Camp 3 for the final summit push. The higher the altitude you are naturally acclimatized to without supplementary oxygen the better. Of course, this does need to be balanced with giving your body the best possible run up to summit push, some climbers acclimatize slower and might want to use O2 slightly sooner for the rotation phase. Again, your guide and Sherpa team are there to advise you during this process.

During the rotation phase of this expedition we can be climbing for anything from 3 – 8 hours a day, depending on the section of the mountain. Distances are not great and our speed and level of competency will get increase as you acclimatize and become technically more proficient during the rotations.

DAY 31-34 : Rest

We will have been watching the weather forecasts very closely throughout our rotations but even more importantly now so that we can plan our summit phase.

DAY 35 - 40 : Summit phase of expedition

We will have been watching the weather forecasts very closely throughout our rotations but even more importantly now as we begin to plan our summit phase. Once we’ve had the all clear and are happy that we have a good weather window we retrace our steps back up to Camp 3 over a period of 2 or 3 days and on leaving C3 we will begin using oxygen for the first time. Thereafter the route to the South Col takes us through the Yellow Band, a loose band of limestone, and crosses a short snow field then moves up to the Geneva Spur before finally taking us into the broad South Col, Camp 4 at 7,950m.

The climb from C3 to C4 should take around 6 hours and with an early morning start, we hope to arrive in camp by midday after which we will spend the rest of the day resting and trying to relax. Climbers rarely stay longer than half a day at C4 due to the harsh and unforgiving nature of this high-altitude environment. Our plan is to leave camp at around 10pm and aim to reach the summit at sunrise. That’s the plan, what actually happens on the day will vary according to weather and mountain conditions and other teams trying for the summit.

We will leave camp and cross the South Col, heading up a 30° slope to the narrow South East Ridge, gradually climbing higher and higher until we reach The Balcony after around 4 hours. Here we will make our first swap of oxygen and take a rest, eating and drinking a little before heading onto the South Summit at 8,476m, following a narrow traverse to the infamous Hilary Step. From this 12m spur we only have another 40 minutes (or so) of ascent along a wide ridge before we reach the summit of the highest mountain on earth.

Total time from South Col Camp to summit 8 – 10 hours. We then retrace our steps back to Camp 4 (South Col) which will take another 4 hours or so. These times are not a climber’s focus but what we aim for. Weather, prevailing mountain conditions and numbers on the hill will dictate what is achievable.

After a short rest and water replenishment we head down the Lhotse face back to C2, resting for the night before descending in the early hours of the morning back to base camp for summit success celebrations.

DAY 41 : Rest

A well-deserved rest day at Base Camp.

DAY 42 - 47 : Departure phase of expedition

DAY 42 : Pack up base camp

DAY 43 : Trek to Pheriche**

DAY 44 : Trek to Namche

DAY 45 : Trek to Lukla

DAY 46 : Fly to Kathmandu

DAY 47 : Fly Home

Unless departed on the night flight yesterday today you will leave Kathmandu on the early morning flight back to the UK.

** Please see FAQs for options for returning to either Lukla or Kathmandu by helicopter from Base Camp

 

DAY 48-59 : Contingency Days

Contingency Days.

These are subject to minor changes depending on flight arrival and departure times, weather, group dynamics and fitness and so on, but the itinerary outlined provides an excellent indication of the trek and what you will experience.

Kit List

Bags & Packs

Kit bag

Heavy duty duffel bags with locks.

Quantity: 2

Daysack

Approx. 30L capacity. Your day to day pack that you carry with your daily essentials, fitted with shoulder straps and importantly a waist belt

Headwear

Warm headgear

This can be a warm hat, beanie, balaclava, anything to reduce the heat loss from your head

Quantity: 2

Wide brimmed hat

Keeps the sun off exposed areas like ears and the nape of the neck

Neck warmer/ buff

Quantity: 2

Goggles

1 clear lens, 1 dark lens

Quantity: 2

Sunglasses

Worth spending money on good UV filters. For glacier work category 4 with side and nose protectors.  Julbo is our preferred supplier

Quantity: 2

Face mask

Protection against bad weather, cold and uv radiation

Upper Body

Down jacket

These provide the best insulation and are worth every penny. Ask advice in the shop (or from us) when buying the jacket and mention you want it rated to -40C and the assistant will recommend the correct fill for you

Down suit

It is highly recommended to wear a full down suit, rather than a combination of a down jacket and trousers for summit day

Gore-Tex hard shell jacket

A good Gore-Tex hard shell jacket with sealed seams provides effective defence against wind and rain as your outermost layer. This should be big enough to fit over your other layers

Gilet (optional)

down or synthetic vest

Light insulated jacket

A lighter jacket such as a Primaloft or lightweight down which can be worn at lower to mid altitudes is a great addition to your kit offering greater flexibility with layering

Thermal top

To keep you warm at colder temperatures

Quantity: 2

Mid layer (long sleeved fleece tops)

These are typically lightweight microfleeces or similar technology that provide varying degrees of warmth and insulation without being overly bulky or heavy to pack

Base layer

This is the layer closest to the skin and its principal function is to draw (wick) moisture and sweat away from the skin. You can also get thermal base layers for use at higher altitudes that provide an additional insulative layer while still drawing sweat during times of high exertion

Quantity: 2

High altitude down mitts

Worn over liners for summit days on all 6,000m plus expeditions. Mitts provide more warmth than finger gloves. For extreme cold down or prima loft fill is recommended

Thick system gloves

Waterproof shell gloves with pile liners

Gloves

medium fleece gloves

Hand warmers

Lower Body

Climbing trousers

1 light and 1 medium weight

Quantity: 2

Down trousers

Essential for higher altitudes

Thermal leggings

1 light, 1 medium

Quantity: 2

Waterproof overtrousers

Like the jacket, an essential piece of kit to stay dry and should also be Goretex

Feet

High altitude boots

Triple Climbing Boots suitable for above 8000m

Boots / approach shoes

Comfortable trainers

For evening use and to give your feet a break once we reach the camps

Crampons

12 point mountaineering crampons with anti-balling plates that fit your specific boots (not ice climbing crampons)

Gaiters

To protect the tops of your footwear from harsh conditions and to provide some added insulation

Hand and foot warmers

Warm mountaineering socks

2 pairs heavy climbing socks to be worn with triple boots

Quantity: 2

Socks

2 pairs medium weight trekking socks

Quantity: 2

Foot powder

Camp Booties

Down booties with a sole

Technical Equipment

Harness

We recommend Petzl harnesses and the Black Diamond “Alpine Bod”

Helmet

Petzl “Ecrin Roc” and Black Diamond “Half Dome” recommended

Ascender

Ascender with single length sling

Sling (120cm)

120cm slings. One to be used as a cows tail and the other as back up

Quantity: 2

Carabiners & prussik loops

3 locking carabiners and 4 non-locking carabiners

Quantity: 7

Prusik loops

20 feet of prusik cord

Ice axe

Ice axe – alpine axe that is long enough for walking and has a leash.

Figure of 8

Figure of 8 or other descendeur  for abseiling

Trekking poles

These tend to be a personal preference but help with your stability and can dampen the pressure on the knees coming down hill

Waterproof/dustproof rucksack cover

To protect rucksack from rain/dust

Sleeping Gear

5 Season sleeping bag

5-season sleeping bag with a comfort rating of -40C is essential. Down is lighter but more expensive than synthetic and ratings vary between manufacturers

4 Season sleeping bag

You should get a sleeping bag rated to -20C and choose a sleeping bag that functions within the comfort rating of this temperature. A silk sleeping bag liner will enhance this rating on the coldest nights

Sleeping mat

1 closed cell foam, 1 inflatable

Quantity: 2

Hydration

Water bottles

2x 1L water bottles

Thermal flask

Water purification

Although generally all water is boiled some prefer to double up and add purification tabs as well. Always good to have in your bag

Toiletries

Lip salve

Sun cream will not work on your lips and they are very susceptible to burn without proper protection

Sunblock

Essential for protection from the sun

Alcohol gel

A must have for good camp hygiene

Wet wipes

Preferably biodegradable, these are great for washing when modern shower facilities become a thing of the past

Expedition towel

Towels from the likes of Lifesystems are perfect

Wash kit

Keep it simple on the mountain. Essentials are toothbrush, toothpaste and deodorant. Moisturiser is advisable, everything else is a luxury!

Miscellaneous

Head torch

+ batteries

Camera

Bring plenty of spare batteries and memory cards

Multi tool

Including allen keys

Documentation

Passport

Don’t forget this! Your passport should have at least 6 months validity.  With your passport expiry date at least six months after the final day of travel.

Copy of passport

Just in case

Passport photos x 4

We need these to obtain your climbing and trekking permits

Watch with alarm

altitude watch

Entertainment

Book or Kindle/iPad with movies/tv series

Bowl

Collapsible Cup, bowl, spoon

Snacks

You will be fed very well and given snacks each day however we advise bringing a small selection as a little bit of comfort.  For summit night it’s always good to have a few extra chunky bars for that extra boost. Energy gels and protein bars are not suitable

Medications

Med-kit and personal medication

Basic medical kit with high altitude meds should include: blister kit, low dose aspirin, bandaids, wound closure strips, triple antibiotic ointment, basic repair kit, scissors, diamox (acetezolomide, 125mg) for AMS, niphedepine (for pulmonary edema, time release), dexamethazone (for cerebral edema, 4mg), antacids, NSAIDs such as aspirin or ibuprophen, anti-diarrheal, duct tape, ear plugs, Antibiotics (upper respiratory such as Azithromycin and a gastero-intestinal such as Ciproflaxin), meletonin, Athsma medication if you use it (Advair), cold and flu medication. Prescription medications in consultation with your doctor.

FAQs

Guides, Sherpa team & Climbing options

Why did 360 Expeditions decide to team up with CTSS?

We believe that teaming our expertise and having fewer competing operators on Everest makes for a far better and safer scenario, not only for 360 and CTSS but for every climber.

Best guides: the quality of an expedition is, in large part dictated by the individual guide(s) leading the trip.  Rolfe Oostra will be one of the head guides on Everest South in conjunction with CTSS. More on Rolfe can be found here under his extensive CV. Rolfe will be working alongside CTSS owner Mike Hamill, a very highly experienced high altitude guide and 6-time Everest summiteer.

Logistics: 360 Expeditions and CTSS have both led countless high-altitude expeditions and have perfected the expedition logistics, allowing you to focus on climbing, safely and successfully.

Local Outfitters and Sherpa: The Sherpa support is hugely important when climbing any big peak. We work with the best in the industry. They all do an amazing job helping you attain your goals and navigating local obstacles. Rolfe, 360 and CTSS hold us to very high standards and expect the same of those they partner with internationally. You will be impressed by the level of service and attentiveness shown to you and your expedition by these wonderful people.

What climbing options are available?

Below you will find a list of Everest South climbing options that 360 and CTSS offer.

Sherpa Supported Climb

For the highly experienced mountaineer with previous 8000m experience and proven competence in the high mountains, we offer a Sherpa Supported Climb.

This option combines the autonomy of independent climbing with the oversight of renowned expedition leaders Rolfe Oostra and Mike Hamill, the safety of a personal climbing Sherpa above camp 2 on the summit bid and support of our Sherpa team to assist with load carries.

This is the perfect option for those with significant high altitude experience who are adept at mountain craft. If you are interested in this option please contact us to see if you qualify.

Climbers need to have a high level of experience, solid climbing skills and be able to manage themselves fully.

You will be paired with a personal Sherpa who will climb with you above Camp 2 on the summit rotation. Our personal Sherpa will be available to carry some of your personal gear. Also, throughout the Everest acclimatization rotations climbing Sherpa will help you carry your personal gear from camp-to-camp, alleviating much of the weight burden of climbing Everest.

$44,995 USD

What's included in the Sherpa Supported Climb?

Included in this option are:

  • Leadership and climbing oversight by renowned expedition leaders
  • A personal climbing Sherpa above Camp 2 on the summit bid
  • Climbing Sherpa to carry all group gear and to assist with personal gear
  • Full expedition logistics, weather forecasts etc
  • Flights to and from Lukla
  • Airport transfers
  • Accommodation in Nepal including hotels and teahouses
  • Welcome dinner, food and drink throughout the expedition
  • Oxygen system
  • Lobuche East peak training and acclimatization climb
  • Sate of the art Base Camp setup and tent accommodation
  • Access to medical and communications gear
  • On mountain tents and food,
  • Support for a summit attempt on Mt Everest. 

Personal Sherpa Climb: 1:1 max Client: Sherpa ratio Climb

This individual climb includes a highly qualified and experienced climbing Sherpa whom we have worked with for years and oversight and expedition leadership by Rolfe Oostra and Mike Hamill.  The climbing Sherpa are hand-picked and are the best in the business. They are all knowledgeable, kind, strong, experienced, respectful, and very proficient.

This option is suited for participants who want the oversight and safety of a skilled personal Sherpa climbing partner and an experienced expedition leader, with the added support of Sherpa to assist with load carries but who feels confident and self directed.

Climbers need to have solid climbing skills and be able to manage themselves fully. They need to have experience above 7,000m (Aconcagua is ok) or 8000m and preferably be familiar with a high-altitude oxygen and mask system.

Your personal Sherpa will meet you at base camp and be climbing with you throughout your Mt. Everest climb including on the acclimatization rotations and on the summit bid. Please note, when you are resting at base camp or on the Lobuche East peak acclimatization climb they will be ferrying loads to the upper camps to prepare for your climb.

Your Sherpa will be available to help carry your personal gear on each rotations to and from the upper camps reducing the weight burden for your climb.

$48,995

What's included in the Personal Sherpa Climb: 1:1 max Client: Sherpa ratio Climb?

Included in this option are:

  • Experienced & Strong personal Sherpa
  • Leadership and climbing oversight by renowned expedition leaders Rolfe Oostra and Mike Hamill
  • Full expedition logistics, weather forecasts etc
  • Flights to and from Lukla
  • Airport transfers
  • Accommodation in Nepal including hotels and teahouses
  • Welcome dinner, food and drink throughout the expedition
  • Oxygen system
  • Lobuche East peak training and acclimatization climb
  • Climbing Sherpa to carry all group gear and to assist with personal gear,
  • State of the art Base Camp setup and tent accommodation
  • Access to medical and communications gear
  • On mountain tents and food,
  • Support for a summit attempt on Mt Everest.

Private Sherpa Guided Climbs (Fully Internationally Certified IFMGA Sherpa Guide): 1:1 max Client: Sherpa Guide ratio

This private climb option includes a fully internationally certified Sherpa guide with oversight and expedition leadership by Rolfe Oostra and Mike Hamill. Fully Internationally Certified Guides, these Sherpa are some of the finest Guides and mountaineers in the business. They have all climbed extensively in the Himalaya and across the world including undertaking intensive training in Europe with IFMGA instructors.They are a trusted part the team and are more like family. We believe wholeheartedly in their leadership and expertise. They are both knowledgeable, kind, strong, experienced, respectful, and very proficient climbers.

This option is suited for participants who want the oversight, safety, and personal attention of a skilled, fully certified Sherpa guide and an experienced expedition leader, with the added support of Sherpa’s to assist with load carries and a personal Sherpa to climb with them on the upper mountain summit bid. Climbers need to have solid climbing skills and need to be able to manage themselves fully. They need to have high altitude climbing experience and preferably be familiar with a high-altitude oxygen and mask system.

Your Sherpa guide will meet you at base camp and be with you throughout the entire Everest climb and be available for refresher training. Also, throughout the Everest acclimatization rotations climbing Sherpa will help you carry your personal gear from camp-to-camp, alleviating much of the weight burden of climbing Everest.

$57,995 – $89,995

What's included in the Private Sherpa Guided Climbs?

Included in this option are:

  • Private IFMGA certified Sherpa Guide
  • Leadership and climbing oversight by renowned expedition leaders Rolfe Oostra and  Mike Hamill
  • Full expedition logistics, weather forecasts etc
  • Flights to and from Lukla
  • Airport transfers
  • Accommodation in Nepal including hotels and teahouses
  • Welcome dinner, food and drink throughout the expedition
  • Oxygen system
  • Lobuche East peak training and acclimatization climb
  • Climbing Sherpa to carry all group gear and to assist with personal gear,
  • State of the art Base Camp setup and tent accommodation
  • Access to medical and communications gear
  • On mountain tents and food
  • Support for a summit attempt on Mt Everest.

Who are the Fully Internationally Certified IFMGA Sherpas? part 1

Big Tendi Sherpa Guided Climb 1:1

  • 3x Everest summits having guided 17x clients successfully to the top
  • Technical Director for Nepal Mountain Guide Association representing Nepal all over the world
  • Veteran mountain guide
  • A tenured climbing instructor who has literally taught a generation of Sherpa
  • Guided well over 100 mountains around the world including Everest, peaks in France & Italy and climbed and guided in over 30 countries around the world.
  • Partner in the local logistics company

Lam Babu Sherpa Guided Climb 1:1

  • Multiple Everest summiteer with 30+ years of experience
  • Our most senior private IFMGA Sherpa Guide
  • Tenured Instructor for the Nepal Mountaineering Association & Guide School
  • Has worked as a Sirdar (Lead Sherpa) for many Everest expeditions

Pasang Tendi Sherpa Guided Climb 1:1

  • Multiple Everest summiteer
  • A client favorite! (By far one of the nicest, most humble personalities you will come across paired with climbing prowess and expertise)
  • Guides and climbs throughout the Himalaya, Europe and the USA

Who are the Fully Internationally Certified IFMGA Sherpas? part 2

Pemba Gelji Sherpa Guided Climb 1:1

  • Multiple Everest summiteer
  • Simone Moro’s longtime climbing partner
  • Expeditions to K2, Manaslu, Cho Oyu
  • Climbed Kanchenjunga in a single day (the World’s 3rd highest peak)
  • NOLS wilderness first aider, high mountain rescue instructor for Nepal Mountaineering Association, trained in Longline helicopter rescue
  • Speaks 5x languages
  • Guides and climbs throughout the Himalaya, Europe and the USA

Tenji Sherpa Guided Climb 1:1

  • Multiple Everest summiteer
  • The Late Ueli Steck’s climbing partner on the North Face Cholatse and many others
  • Guides and climbs throughout the Himalaya, Europe and the USA

Who is Tendi Sherpa?

This is your once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to climb with legendary Mt. Everest guide, Sirdar, and climbing Sherpa, Tendi Sherpa!

Tendi is perhaps the most respected guide and Sherpa on Mt. Everest because of his leadership, humility, safety conscience, strength, work ethic, demeanor, and technical ability.

We firmly believe he is the best guide on the mountain, Sherpa or non-Sherpa (narrowly edging out western guide Casey Grom only because Tendi, being Sherpa, is born to work at extreme altitudes). We are not alone in this belief- nearly every day on Everest people come up to us to tell us how great Tendi is! Tendi is a 12X Everest summiteer, fully IFMGA certified guide, world-class climber, our CTSS Sirdar (lead Sherpa), co-owner of our local outfitter TAG Nepal, Director of the “Tendi Guide Foundation”, author, wonderful husband and father, to name just a few attributes.

There is simply no finer guide on Everest than Tendi, so if you want to stack the odds in your favor for a great price, this is the way to do it. (Get to know Tendi: we will arrange for you to speak with Tendi personally as we know that you will be as impressed as we are).

Western Guided Team Climb with Rolfe Oostra

This classic Mt. Everest guided climb is our most popular option and is best suited to climbers who would like Western guidance but are competent, confident, and team orientated climbers. Our team guided climb offers great opportunity for success and is often reported as being the most fun & enjoyable climb because of the camaraderie and sense of community with their fellow climbers. These friendships last a lifetime.

Rolfe Oostra a renowned mountaineer will be fronting the 2021 Western guided team. For more on Rolfe please have a look at his remarkable CV here. Rolfe is a sought-after expedition guide who makes each trip individual and hugely memorable. He can be wild, he is fun and is generally a bit of a legend.

This option includes an additional personal Sherpa above Camp 2 on the summit bid as well as oversight and leadership by Rolfe Oostra and Mike Hamill.

Rolfe will meet you in Kathmandu and be with you for the entire climb including the Lobuche East acclimatization climb and at base camp for training, expertise, and acclimatization hikes. Also, throughout the Everest acclimatization rotations. Your climbing Sherpa will help you carry your personal gear from camp-to-camp, alleviating much of the weight burden of climbing Everest.

$62,995 USD

What's included in the Western Guided Team Climb with Rolfe Oostra/

Included in this option are:

  • A highly experienced Western Climbing Guide with prior Everest summits: Rolfe Oostra
  • Leadership and climbing oversight by renowned expedition leaders Rolfe Oostra and Mike Hamill
  • A personal Sherpa above Camp 2 on the summit bid
  • Full expedition logistics, weather forecasts etc
  • Flights to and from Lukla
  • Airport transfers
  • Accommodation in Nepal including hotels and teahouses
  • Welcome dinner, food and drink throughout the expedition
  • Oxygen system
  • Lobuche East peak training and acclimatization climb
  • Climbing Sherpa to carry all group gear and to assist with personal gear,
  • State of the art Base Camp setup and tent accommodation
  • Access to medical and communications gear
  • On mountain tents and food,
  • Support for a summit attempt on Mt Everest.

Private Western Guided Climb: 1:1 Client:Guide

If you want to truly stack the odds in your favor for success, this is the option for you. There is no better way to ensure you stand on top of Mt. Everest than by having the personal attention and guidance of a world-class private guide by your side throughout the entire climb. We will pair you with one of our most sought after, experienced Mt Everest guides available. (We will arrange for you to speak with your private guide prior to your climb as we know that you will be as impressed as we are). If you wish for your guide to be Rolfe Oostra then this is an option. This option includes a Mt Everest veteran as your private western guide as well as a personal Sherpa above Camp 2 on the summit bid, oversight and leadership by expedition leaders, Rolfe Oostra and Mike Hamill. Your guide will meet you in Kathmandu and be with you for the entire climb including the Lobuche East acclimatization climb and at base camp for training, expertise, advice and acclimatization hikes. Also, throughout the Everest acclimatization rotations. Your climbing Sherpa will help you carry your personal gear from camp-to-camp, alleviating much of the weight burden of climbing Everest.

This option is for those who want to stack the odds in their favor as highly as possible with unparalleled safety and personal attention throughout their climb. Whether you’re a less experienced Himalayan climber or have climbed above 8000m many times before, our private climb with 1:1 Western guide and a personal climbing Sherpa gives you the best chance at standing on top of Everest. Our private western guided climb offers the best opportunity for success.

$118,995 USD

What's included in the Private Western Guided Climb: 1:1 Client:Guide?

This private climb option includes:

  • Mt Everest veteran private guide
  • Leadership and climbing oversight by renowned expedition leaders Rolfe Oostra and Mike Hamill
  • Personal Sherpa above Camp 2 on summit bid
  • Full expedition logistics, weather forecasts etc
  • Flights to and from Lukla
  • Airport transfers
  • Accommodation in Nepal including hotels and teahouses
  • Welcome dinner, food and drink throughout the expedition
  • Oxygen system
  • Lobuche East peak training and acclimatization climb
  • Climbing Sherpa to carry all group gear and to assist with personal gear,
  • State of the art Base Camp setup and tent accommodation
  • Access to medical and communications gear
  • On mountain tents and food,
  • Support for a summit attempt on Mt Everest.

Speed Ascent

The speed ascent programs offer considerably shorter itineraries by taking advantage of pre-acclimatization technology in the comfort of your own home before you depart.

Depending on your unique needs and schedule we will tailor an itinerary to suit you.

30 Day Schedule
The more aggressive 30 days schedule requires a longer pre-acclimatization period at home of 8 weeks using Hypoxico systems before flying directly to Pheriche and joining the Western Guided team already at Base Camp.

40 Day Schedule

The 40 day schedule utilizes a more natural acclimatization following a 6 week pre-acclimatization period at home using the Hypoxico systems. You will fly into Pheriche and meet the Western Guided team ready for an ascent of Lobuche East Peak, giving you the added benefit of an extra rotation and another great Himalayan Peak. 360 Expeditions and Rolfe will be supporting CTTS in delivering this state-of-the-art program.

If you think this option may be right for you please contact us directly and we will work with you on a personalized plan to allow our “Speed Ascent” Program to maximize results for you.

30 Days: $74,995 USD
40 Days: $71,995 USD

How does the Hypoxico system work?

We pride ourselves on this cutting edge of new approaches to climbing mountains that improve safety, success, and efficiency. We have been working with clients for years now using portable hypoxic chambers to pre-accustom their bodies to the rarefied air found at altitude, and with great success. Through this program, we work with you to use special designed altitude chambers in the comfort of your own bed so you can spend more time at home with your loved ones and less time away on expedition. Also, mitigating the amount of time spent in harm’s way in the mountains and at extreme altitudes can improve safety. We use a time-tested training program in conjunction with the use of a portable hypoxic altitude chamber to pre-acclimate your body to the rarefied air found on Everest.

We will have a portable Hypoxico tent sent you your residence so that you can begin acclimating your body more than a month in advance of your climb. We will also organize separate logistics and a helicopter from Lukla to Pheriche to avoid the trek and begin your climb with our Lobuche East ascent with the rest of the climbing team.

We feel that these altitude chambers are not substitute for fully acclimating properly in the mountains, that is why we take a measured, conservative approach, but have found that they can be an incredibly valuable tool. They can facilitate acclimatization and mitigate the amount of time spent in the mountains. Do you have serious time constraints and need to spend more time focusing on work, productivity, and family at home rather than tediously acclimatizing on the mountain? Many people have these concerns and that is why our “Speed Ascent” program has become so popular.

What's included in the Speed Ascents?

Included in this option are:

  • Hypoxico portable altitude chamber
  • A highly experienced Western Climbing Guide with prior Everest summits
  • Leadership and climbing oversight by renowned expedition leaders Rolfe Oostra and Mike Hamill
  • A personal Sherpa above Camp 2 on the summit bid
  • Separate logistics in Kathmandu to Pheriche
  • A helicopter flight from Lukla to Pheriche
  • Full mountain expedition logistics, weather forecasts etc
  • Flights to and from Lukla
  • Airport transfers
  • Accommodation in Nepal including hotels and teahouses
  • Welcome dinner, food and drink throughout the expedition
  • Oxygen system
  • Lobuche East peak training and acclimatization climb
  • Climbing Sherpa to carry all group gear and to assist with personal gear,
  • State of the art Base Camp setup and tent accommodation
  • Access to medical and communications gear
  • On mountain tents and food,
  • Support for a summit attempt on Mt Everest.

Speed Ascent with Private Western Guided Climb: (1:1 max ratio)

Our speed ascent programs offer considerably shorter itineraries by taking advantage of pre-acclimatization technology in the comfort of your own home before you depart.

30 Day Schedule
The more aggressive 30 days schedule requires a longer pre-acclimatization period at home of 8 weeks using Hypoxico systems before flying directly to Pheriche and joining the Western Guided team already at Base Camp.

40 Day Schedule

The 40 day schedule utilises a more natural acclimatization following a 6 week pre-acclimatization period at home using the Hypoxico systems. You will fly into Pheriche and meet the Western Guided team ready for an ascent of Lobuche East Peak, giving you the added benefit of an extra rotation and another great Himalayan Peak.

Combined with a Private Western Guide:

There is no better way to ensure you stand on top of Mt. Everest than by having the personal attention and guidance of a world-class private guide by your side throughout the entire climb, but we understand many of our climbers are busy professionals who are pressed for time so we have customized a Speed Ascent Program coupled with a Private Western guide to give you the best of both worlds.

30 Days: $129,995 USD
40 Days: $127,995 USD

How does this program work?

Through this program, we work with you to use special designed altitude chambers in the comfort of your own bed so you can spend more time at home with your loved ones and less time away on expedition. Also, mitigating the amount of time spent in harm’s way in the mountains and at extreme altitudes can improve safety. We use a time-tested training program in conjunction with the use of a portable hypoxic altitude chamber to pre-acclimate your body to the rarefied air found on Everest.  This climb cuts off about ten days from the other Everest options and joins the expedition in Pheriche before heading up for the Lobuche East peak acclimatization climb. We will have a portable Hypoxico tent sent you your residence so that you can begin acclimating your body more than a month in advance of your climb. Following your at home acclimatization schedule, separate logistics and a helicopter from Lukla to Pheriche and you will begin your climb with our Lobuche East ascent with your Private Guide. We feel that these altitude chambers are not substitute for fully acclimating properly in the mountains, that is why we take a measured, conservative approach, but have found that they can be an incredibly valuable tool. They can facilitate acclimatization and mitigate the amount of time spent in the mountains. Your private Western guide will be one of the most sought after, experienced Everest guides on the mountain and will be there to meet you off the helicopter in Pheriche. During rotations, a climbing Sherpa will help you carry your personal gear from camp-to-camp, alleviating much of the weight burden of climbing Everest and you will be joined by a personal climbing Sherpa from Camp 2 on your summit bid.

What's included in the Speed Ascent with Private Western Guided Climb?

Included in this option are:

  • A highly experience, Private Western Mountain Guide with prior Everest summits
  • Hypoxico portable altitude chamber
  • Leadership and climbing oversight by renowned expedition leaders Rolfe Oostra and Mike Hamill
  • A personal Sherpa above Camp 2 on the summit bid
  • Separate logistics in Kathmandu to Pheriche
  • A helicopter flight from Lukla to Pheriche
  • Full mountain expedition logistics, weather forecasts etc
  • Flights to and from Lukla
  • Airport transfers
  • Accommodation in Nepal including hotels and teahouses
  • Welcome dinner, food and drink throughout the expedition
  • Oxygen system
  • Lobuche East peak training and acclimatization climb
  • Climbing Sherpa to carry all group gear and to assist with personal gear,
  • State of the art Base Camp setup and tent accommodation
  • Access to medical and communications gear
  • On mountain tents and food,
  • Support for a summit attempt on Mt Everest.

What is Everest Executive?

The signature piece of our “Everest Executive” model is our insulated, heated and humidified personal geodesic domes that feel more like a unique hotel room than a tent!

Featuring:

  • Windows with curtains to take in the epic views
  • A Queen sized bed with comforter & pillows
  • Table and chair to create a private workspace that allows professionals and business executives to productively use valuable downtime at base camp to continue to manage work obligations or to simply keep up with friends and family and update social media.
  • Heating System & raised, carpeted flooring to insulate from the glacier
  • Overhead lighting, personal charging facilities and personal humidifier
  • Morning beverage service
  • Shoe rack

If you are stressed for time, you can consider combining our Everest Executive program with our the Speed Ascent option to live in luxury AND minimize your time away from home.

*Please note that the Everest Executive program is non-refundable and non-transferable and is suitable only for single rooming. Couples can be accommodated at an additional surcharge of $1,995*.

Everest Executive: $11,250 USD

What is Everest Associate?

Our Everest Associate add on is perfect for climbers wishing to enjoy a step above our traditional service by living in incredible comfort in a two room, insulated house tent.

Those that choose our Everest Associate option will enjoy:

  • Raised wood flooring with carpet to insulate from the glacier
  • Single bed with comforter and pillow
  • Entryway room for private gear storage
  • Overhead lighting
  • Table & Chair to create a private workspace
  • Shoe Rack
  • Morning Beverage Service

(Please note that tent accommodations at Lobuche high camp and above Everest base camp are double-occupancy.). Having a single room throughout goes a long way towards keeping you healthy and helping you get the rest you need to climb strong, thus improving summit success.

If you are stressed for time, you can consider combining our Everest Executive program with the Speed Ascent option to live in luxury AND minimize your time away from home.

*Please note that the Everest Associate program is non-refundable and non-transferable and is suitable only for single rooming. Couples can be accommodated at an additional surcharge of $1,995*

Everest Associate: $5,995 USD

Can I combine climbing Everest and Lhotse?

Lhotse Climb Add-on: $18,995 USD 

Combining an ascent of Mt. Everest and Lhotse is a huge feat but due to advancements in oxygen system technology and our rope fixing infrastructure, it is a reasonable possibility to tag 2 X 8000m summits in under 24 hours. Lhotse is the world’s fourth tallest mountain and a huge prize in its own right. By adding a day of climbing on the descent from Mt. Everest one can feasibly tag the top of Lhotse as well by veering off just below the Geneva Spur and climbing the steep snow couloir that is summit day of Lhotse.

If you’re really goal driven, chasing the 8,000m peaks, or simply want to enter the record books of a tiny number of people that have completed this feat, we’re happy to help you make this happen.

After summiting Mt Everest, you will rest on oxygen at either the South Col or Lhotse high camp for the night before climbing Lhotse’s summit pyramid early the next morning, and dropping down to Camp 2 that same day. If this goal interests you, we will organize logistics for a Lhotse add-on for you.

Who will my point of contact be during the build up?

Depending on your package will dictate who will be your main point of contact but initially feel free contact 360 Expeditions, who will offer you a very dedicated office crew ready to help with all your questions and concerns.  They will be your main point of contact in the early days.  360 Expeditions will then incorporate chats with your head guide, Sherpa and Mike Hamill.

The Climb

What are the Everest South expedition highlights?

  • Watch the sunrise from the summit of the world’s highest peak, peering down at both the Tibetan plateau and Nepalese lowlands at the same altitude that planes fly
  • Climb through the famous and rugged Khumbu Icefall
  • Experience Sherpa culture and hospitality
  • Watch the sunrise over neighboring giant, Pumori, from the Western Cwm
  • Experience Puja, the pre-climb blessing, with our Sherpa climbers
  • Tour Kathmandu’s cultural sights and see a slice of Nepal
  • See the Himalayas from the air while flying in to Lukla to start our trek

Can I buy extra oxygen and how much is it?

Extra Oxygen: $8,995 USD 

All our expeditions allocate a very generous supply of oxygen. In general, we plan to run an oxygen flow of 3L/min or more while climbing, and 1L/min sleeping. With the advanced technology of our hyper-efficient, state-of-the-art oxygen masks, this is usually more than enough. We give you 11 bottles (8 for you and 3 for your Sherpa). So, long story short is you don’t need extra oxygen.

However, if you can afford it we generally recommend purchasing extra oxygen. We consider it cheap insurance. With the extra oxygen, you can run at a higher flow rate which will keep you warmer, allowing you to move faster on summit day and reducing your fatigue levels when you return to the South Col, all of which goes a long way towards keeping you safe. Also, if you get delayed due to weather at the South Col for a day, need to turn back on your first summit attempt for any reason, or miss thread your bottle which can periodically happen, having the extra Os may save your summit bid.

The extra oxygen option buys 3 more bottles of oxygen delivered to the upper mountain (we will discuss strategy on how to best use this extra oxygen). With the extra Os you can run high flow (4 – 5L/min) throughout summit day, start oxygen at Camp 2, and/or have a bit extra in case of delays at the South Col etc.

*Please note, extra oxygen is non-refundable and non-transferable*

Will we be taught how to use the oxygen systems?

Top quality, reliable oxygen tanks, masks and regulators will be provided for you on your climb and we will go through their usage in depth at base camp so you can practice before your climb. We typically use oxygen from Camp 3 (roughly 7,300m) to sleep & climb on to the summit. If you are interested in extra oxygen to use from C2 (roughly 6,400m) on the summit bid and to run a higher flow rate on summit day please let us know in advance and we can arrange this.

What are the prerequisites and how difficult is to climb Everest?

Difficulty: Intermediate to Advanced

Mt. Everest is an iconic mountain in the Himalayas and the world’s tallest peak. It towers above the high Tibetan plateau to the North and the lush green pastures of Nepal to the South. First climbed in 1953 by Tenzing Norway Sherpa & Sir Edmund Hillary it is one of the world’s greatest adventures and the crown jewel of high altitude mountaineering.

Climbing Mt. Everest requires serious fitness, an ability to perform well at altitude, the mindset to be away from home for 8-10 weeks, along with the desire for rugged adventure travel. Climbers need solid cramponing skill and familiarity with glacier and fixed line climbing techniques. If you want to join this expedition but don’t have these skills we can work with you to get you up to speed prior to the climb. Please let us know how we can help!

On this expedition you will be climbing in the ‘death zone’. Beginning with an imaginary line at 8,000m the oxygen in the atmosphere is so sparse at this altitude that the human body cannot stay for prolonged periods of time. We work with lightweight oxygen systems, state of the art equipment, a refined acclimatization schedule, the best weather forecasting available and phenomenal Sherpa teams to give you the greatest opportunity for success.

What’s the Everest South expedition strategy?

Our Mt. Everest expedition meets in Kathmandu where we obtain our climbing permits, run through gear checks and have a team meeting. We stay at the famous and historic “Yak and Yeti” hotel in the heart of town and use this as our base for packing and organizing gear.

Following our time in Kathmandu we fly to Lukla to start the trek. We land at the Hillary runway at roughly 9,000ft/3,000m. From the moment you land in Lukla you will be at altitude. It’s important to take it easy and let your body adjust to the altitude naturally. From here we make our way up the Khumbu valley staying at some of the finest lodges in the region in order to mitigate the stress so you can focus on the climb.

Hygiene is incredibly important to us and we take many precautions to make sure our team avoids getting sick. Despite this, illness can be a fact of life in Nepal so chances are people will at least experience a stomach rumbling at some point during the expedition.

You’ll note in our schedule that we climb Lobuche peak en route to Everest base camp. This is both a great climb in and of itself and a great opportunity to make sure your climbing skills are up to speed, but it is also part of our strategy for climbing Everest. One of the most dangerous sections of climbing on Everest is the Khumbu ice fall. We try to limit the number of trips we make through the ice fall and mitigate the amount of time we spend in it. Climbing Lobuche allows us to do one less rotation through the ice fall which makes our Everest climb safer. We see this as huge “value added” to our expeditions not only for the safety factor but also because you will climb another Himalayan gem.

Once at base camp we get settled in and use a slow, methodical acclimatization strategy to position ourselves for the summit bid. Most expeditions rush this process and suffer the consequences of altitude illness because of it. Once at base camp we will make three forays up the mountain to successively higher altitudes to prepare for the summit bid, with plenty of rest back at base camp in between.

Our base camp is first rate. We spare little expense making you feel as comfortable as possible. Our top-notch cooks make you the healthiest food possible with strong hygiene standards. Each of our climbers has their own tent at base camp where they can feel at home when not socializing in the group dining and hangout tents. We have a state-of-the-art communications tent and make internet available to our guests. We receive up-to-date weather reports and have a satellite phone for group use. Our set-up higher on the mountain is top notch as well.

In between acclimatization rotations we spend time training at base camp, practicing both glacier climbing skills like fixed line climbing and crossing ladders, and training with the oxygen systems to make sure you’re fully prepared for the climb ahead. To have these skills second nature before the summit bid can relieve pre-climb nerves and anxiety allowing you to fully focus on your climb.

How early should I commit to my climb?

We feel that the sooner you commit the better as it gives you more time to prepare mentally and physically for the climb.

Climbing Everest is a huge undertaking and something that you will want to work up to consistently. I have found that people are generally more successful when they commit earlier as it gives them longer to shake out any problems that may arise, arrange their home and work life to be away for a number of months, and build their fitness endurance and strength up over time and thereby avoid injury etc.

What's the best climb to prepare for Everest?

Hands down we feel that Cho You or Manaslu is the best, most specific Everest prep. You get an understanding of how your body does at altitudes over 8000m and get familiar with the oxygen system and climbing with the Sherpa.

Why do you choose to climb from the south side?

Both the south and north offer some spectacular climbing. Both have their pros and cons and 360 has operated on both sides numerous times.

The South side has a lot more infrastructure which means there are more assurances including helicopter access, the HRA (Himalayan Rescue Association) medical clinic manned with speciality trained doctors 24/7 at base camp. If something goes wrong, we have much higher chances of evacuating you and getting you to a hospital in Kathmandu within hours, whereas if something were to go wrong on the North Side, it is slower operation.

It's a long time away from home - can my family and friends join me?

Yes, your family and friends are more than welcome to join us on the trek in to base camp and even climb Lobuche peak if they like. (Our standard treks stay a 2 nights in Base Camp before departing but we have had people stay longer and this can be arranged by chatting to us directly)

Please let us know immediately if you have people who want to join us so that we can make arrangements for them. Space in hotels in Kathmandu and in the teahouses is limited during climbing season so we need to know final numbers asap!

What's the acclimatization process?

Our entire expedition including the trip to base camp is slow in order to allow our bodies ample time to acclimate. In the Khumbu, we gain altitude quickly and this slow process will allow us to acclimate properly and avoid altitude sickness. That means there is plenty of down time while your body adjusts. Please bring a few books or movies on your devices and be patient. This is a slow process, but it will give you a much better chance at success on the climb and trek. Make sure to communicate with your guides directly if you are experiencing any altitude issues.

Health & Safety

What is the risk in climbing Everest?

The very nature of climbing an 8,000m peak is risky. Although there are risks associated with climbing any mountain whether it is Kilimanjaro, Mont Blanc or Aconcagua, the risks on an 8,000m peak are considerably greater primarily due to extreme altitude and weather conditions. Physical, mental and technical preparation will go a long way towards a safe ascent. Furthermore, our Western guides and climbing Sherpas are trained in the use of medical oxygen, Gamow bags and specialized wilderness first aid equipment and medicine which we take on all our itineraries. We also carry satellite phones and radios to ensure proper communications with the outside world and between camps. In fact, we are often the first port of call when other teams have an emergency on the mountain!

What happens if there is a problem on the mountain?

All our leaders are in communication with each other by phone and radio.  In the majority of cases of emergency rescue the problems can be attributed to slow acclimatisation or altitude and if so the solution is immediate descent to lower altitudes. Our Nepal crew is very experienced in dealing with any problems that may arise. Our leaders have the highest standard of wilderness first aid qualifications and can handle emergencies to the highest level of competency.

Am I likely to suffer from altitude sickness on this expedition? part 1

The likelihood of getting altitude related problems are dramatically reduced on this expedition due to our carefully designed acclimatisation strategy. We have years of experience in dealing with altitude and its related problems and have devised an ascent strategy which caters for a broad spectrum of individual altitude adaptation. Still it is important to understand there are different types of altitude sickness and that at times altitude related problems can happen and to recognise the symptoms if they occur.

The most common of these is high altitude sickness (AMS – Acute Mountain Sickness).
If you have a mild case, you may experience: dizziness, headache, muscle aches, insomnia, nausea and vomiting, irritability, loss of appetite, swelling of the hands, feet, and face, rapid heartbeat and shortness of breath with physical exertion.

Am I likely to suffer from altitude sickness on this expedition? part 2

Symptoms of severe altitude sickness may include: coughing, chest congestion, pale complexion and skin discoloration, inability to walk or lack of balance and social withdrawal. Our leaders assess each client’s personal situation carefully. By carefully observing the client during the course of the day our leaders are able to quickly determine the probable cause of their clients discomfort.  Apart from a gain in altitude further factors which contribute to the development of AMS symptoms are an insufficient intake of water or ascending too quickly. Further our leaders understand the compounding effects of dehydration brought on by excessive vomiting and loss of appetite and how to best allow a client to recover from exhaustion.

AMS might sound frightening but our leaders are fully trained (and highly experienced) in helping to relieve your personal symptoms and provide advice on how to best proceed.

What can I do to help prevent AMS?

To help avoid AMS, following the below rules can be simple but effective:

  • Pay attention to the advice given to you by your expedition leader
  • Drink lots of water
  • Walk slowly
  • Stay warm
  • Eat well

We recommend that you familiarise yourself with the various affects that altitude can cause. During your pre-climb briefing, we describe altitude sickness to you in detail, and advise you how to cope with it. The most important thing is not to fear it, but to respect it and to know how to deal with it and more importantly tell your leaders how you feel.

Is there a risk of getting HACE (High Altitude Cerebral Oedema) and HAPE (High Altitude Pulmonary Oedema) on the mountain?

The severe forms of altitude sickness, HACE and high altitude pulmonary HAPE are extremely unlikely to occur on this expedition. Our leaders and Sherpa team are fully trained in recognition of the onset of these problems and will deal with them at the first sign of their development and will not let them develop to a dangerous level.

Should I bring Diamox on the expedition with me?

We recommend you come armed with a course of Diamox or other high-altitude drug on this expedition, though we do not recommend that take you these as a prophylactic during the trek or climb. We view Diamox as a treatment drug rather than a preventative medicine. Most adventure medics give similar advice, however we do appreciate this can be confusing, as many GPs (who aren’t necessarily mountaineers) do suggest taking it as a prophylactic.

Here at 360 we pride ourselves on designing all our itineraries with acclimatisation front and centre and this expedition has been carefully designed to allow for your body to adjust to the altitude gradually, safely and comfortably. However, if you find that you are still having problems adjusting to the altitude (see our FAQ on Altitude Sickness) then your expedition leader or medic will recommend the correct course of action regarding taking Diamox.

For the mountain phase, it is highly recommended to carry your own treatment dose of high altitude drugs such as Nifedipine, Dexamethasone or Diamox. We advocate that each team member carries these drugs in the same place (i.e. top LH pocket of your down-suit) so that if an emergency should arise the Expedition leader, climbing Sherpa or fellow team member can locate them easily.

Should I take Diamox?

It is far preferable to take Diamox if and when needed during the course of the expedition. If you are already taking it and then start having altitude related problems you are left with few options but to descend to a more comfortable altitude which sadly often means that the summit is not attainable.

Furthermore, Diamox is a diuretic, meaning you will have to drink a lot of fluid to prevent dehydration. Of course, the upshot of this is you’ll have to pee more which means you’ll probably be having to get up more in the night and take cover behind rocks during the day. Another quite common side-effect is that it can cause your extremities to “buzz and tingle” including your fingers, toes and lips which can feel quite unsettling. Other side-effects can include dizziness and light headedness with loss of appetite, nausea, vomiting and diarrhoea. Although all these side-effects are manageable when you have symptoms of altitude sickness, we personally believe it is counter-intuitive to take it unless necessary.

Of course, it is totally up to you, this is just our recommendation and we’re not doctors. If you do decide to take Diamox on the advice of your doctor then please do let your leader know in situ so they are aware of this. We also suggest you take the drug for a couple of days a few weeks before travelling so you can experience the symptoms before taking them during the trek.

What immunizations do I need?

Make sure your immunizations are up to date. Consult your doctor, local travel clinic, or the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) for updated information on immunizations for Nepal and China. Recommended immunizations include diphtheria-tetanus (DPT), polio, mumps-measles-rubella (MMR), meningitis, hepatitis A and B, cholera and typhoid, and rabies.

Malaria shouldn’t be a problem in Kathmandu or on the climb. If you plan to travel to lower-elevation areas in Nepal before or after the climb, you should consider malaria chemoprophylaxis.

Accommodation

Do you offer a single room option during the trek in guest houses?

Single rooming option: $1,000 USD

We are happy to organize single rooming accommodations and a tea house upgrade for you throughout the expedition. If you snore or are easily awakened by others that do snore, this might be a great option. We feel that having a single room helps climbers stay healthy and adds a bit of comfort and personal space that can go a long way on a two-month expedition such as this. If you would like a single rooming option please let us know. Please note that tent accommodations at Lobuche high camp and above Everest base camp are double-occupancy.

We stay at some of the nicest teahouses in the Khumbu valley throughout our trek to keep you healthy and to provide you with comfort. Many teahouses offer room upgrades which may include an en suite bathroom with hot shower and more space, whereas our normal rooms generally have a shared bathroom and shower for an added fee. Please note, the single room option and tea house upgrade already comes with the “Everest Executive” option if you have chosen that add-on.

Will I be sharing a tent?

No, for the majority of the climb you are not sharing a tent. We stay at the famous “Yak and Yeti” hotel in Kathmandu and in the finest teahouses while trekking to base camp. While at Everest base camp you will have your own tent to spread your gear out and call home. There will be times on the mountain where you will need to share a tent with another climber to reduce the number of dangerous loads the Sherpa need to carry through the treacherous Khumbu Ice fall. It’s also a lot warmer and safer when you can keep an eye on each other.

Which hotel do we stay at in Kathmandu?

We stay at the Yak & Yeti, a heritage hotel located in Durbar Marg. The hotel is in the thriving city center of Kathmandu Valley, in a prime location that is minutes walking distance from the former Royal Palace. Durbar Marg is a commercial area with high-end shops and a variety of food options. Our 5 star deluxe luxury property is 6 KM away from the Tribhuvan International Airport, about 1 KM from the famous tourist hub of Nepal- Thamel.

What does the Base Camp set up look like?

We use North Face VE-25 tents. They’re large, spacious (the same size as a 3 man tent) and extremely high quality. Inside you will have a thick, comfortable 15cm sleeping mattress and a pillow. This is placed on top of a ground cloth to keep out the wet and cold. We do offer a heated double roomed tent under our Everest executive program. To avoid you overcrowding your tent, there is a separate gear tent where you may store your climbing equipment.

What amenities do we have during the expedition? part 1

  • Accommodations at 5-star Hotel in Kathmandu
  • Team jackets and hats for all Mt. Everest and Lhotse climbers
  • The best food on Mt. Everest – think lemon crepes, fresh baked goods like croissants and cinnamon rolls, fresh fruit, vegetables, and meat weekly, hearty soups, chicken cordon blue, burgers, fresh salads, chocolate cake and puddings for dessert, etc. Food is your fuel. Physically and mentally and we believe it is a vital ingredient to your success.
  • A cappuccino machine with barista and cafe sitting area
  • State-of-the-art oxygen systems to maximize your summit chances. Our oxygen system weight 4.5kg total as opposed to the much larger American oxygen system that weighs 8.5kg that some companies use. This 4kg/9lb difference make a HUGE difference on summit day when every ounce counts.
  • The best weather forecasts money can buy sent to us daily to make sure you get the right weather window.
  • Unlimited 3rd party wifi for purchase at base camp.
  • Acclimatization and refresher climb of Lobuche East peak to avoid one rotation through the rugged Khumbu glacier (except for our Speed Asecnt programs)
  • Heating double-walled, custom built dining tents with wooden, insulated, and carpeted floors, and upholstered and padded chairs with armrests

What amenities do we have during the expedition? part 2

  • Insulted and heated Geodesic Hang Out Dome ‘The Big House’ with carpeted floors, lounges, a movie theatre, tables and chairs for doing work, and yoga space
  • Four full-time cooks at Camp 2 to cook food for you while you’re in that camp.
  • Dining tents with chairs and a toilet tents at Camp 2
  • Hot towels infused with eucalyptus oil at dinner
  • A solar array with backup generator for charging devices on international plug adapters
  • The most well-trained and highest paid Sherpa on the mountain
  • Large sleeping tents with lush 6” thick sleeping pads that insulate from the cold and a liner on the bottom of the tent to keep out dampness. And of course, a pillow (on the standard program)
  • Hand wash stations with mirrors in both the foyer of the bathroom and the foyer of the dining room
  • Accommodations at some of the nicest teahouses in the Khumbu Valley
  • A communications tent with ample charging stations
  • A wide array of healthy and nutritious upper mountain food and comfort food to suit a wide variety of palates.
  • A dedicated storage tent to keep your climbing gear and extra gear so you have more room in your tent
  • Two-room toilet tents (one room for hand washing) with sit down toilets
  • Hot showers with two rooms: one for changing and one for showering
  • Choose our Everest Executive or Everest Associate option for many more creature comforts

What about showers?

You can enjoy hot showers at Everest Base Camp. Our Sherpa team set up a permanent private shower tent nearby our collective campsite. Although there is no running water our kitchen crew will be able to heat sufficient water for you to enjoy a shower.

Will my kit be safe in BC when I climb?

Yes, your kit is safe in your tent but we do advise to bring locks for your kit bags when flying which can be used on your bags in your tents to be doubly sure.

Food & Water

How safe is the food and water?

As in Kathmandu, once on the trail to base camp it is highly recommended that you stick to treated rather than tap water. Properly boiled water is available in all the teahouses and bottled water is readily available in stores en route but to reduce the amount of trash and pollution in the valley we encourage you buying boiled or UV treated water from teahouses. You can also bring your own water treatment solution.

We will provide some teas and coffees at mealtimes but if you want sodas, bottled waters, specialty coffees, or drinks outside of mealtimes we ask that you purchase them yourself.

Nepal isn’t known for its cuisine. The food on the trek to base camp can become a bit monotonous but it’s energy dense and fulfilling. Asian inspired, there is a lot of fried rice, rice-based meals, soups, omelettes etc.

Stick to meals where the food is obviously local and sourced from the valley. We stay in reputable teahouses who have a good understanding of food hygiene, so our climbers and trekkers rarely get sick. It’s ok and somewhat expected to get a slightly upset tummy as you’ll be eating food that is different to what you are used to.

At Base Camp, we have our own chefs who are incredible and take every precaution, in a full catering kitchen. They also cook Western foods, have fresh food including fruit, vegetables and meat resupplied regularly and serve a good variety.

Do I need to bring my own snacks?

We do a big Costco run for group snack and meal food for the mountain and will have lots of good stuff but we want to make sure everyone has the food that they need. Even people who aren’t usually picky about food can get really particular about what they can digest on Everest due to the extreme altitude and getting lots of calories is hugely important.

Gu packs, shot blocks, nuts, Snickers bars, cheese, etc… whatever it is that you know you can eat when you don’t want to eat anything is best. Getting speciality and familiar food can be difficult in Nepal so it’s best you bring what you love from home. Also, bring a good supply of cough drops or hard candy as you might like them in the dry air. We’ll have some for the team but people seem to go through them really quickly.

What is the food like on the climb?

At Base Camp you will be served some of the best foods by some of the very best chefs, hands down.

Our climbers are consistently blown away by the quality of food and hygiene at base camp considering where we are in the world. Our head chef trains at 5 star restaurants during the off season. Think lemon crepes, cheese omelettes, chicken cordon bleu, pizza, fresh fruit almost daily, fresh salads, steaks, apple pie, fresh croissants and cinnamon rolls, and moist chocolate cake. We get shipments of fresh meat, fruit, vegetable, and other supplies weekly. Dave Hahn, non-Sherpa Everest summit record holder with 15 summits said about our head chef Kumar, “A real pro. Kumar is the reason I kept climbing in the Himalayas as long as I did.”

Kit

What gear will I need?

Please review the equipment list. While all items are required there may be times when some of the items on the gear list may not be used (such as warm weather or changing conditions). The gear lists are created by the guides so that climbers are prepared to summit in any conditions.

Can I rent equipment for this expedition?

We advocate the use of personal equipment whenever possible. This is particular important for the use of boots and high-altitude clothing.

Alternatively, things you don’t currently have can be hired cost effectively from our partners at Outdoor Hire or sourced through our reliable contacts in Kathmandu.

What clothing should I wear on at the start of the expedition?

Our leaders usually start the trek wearing long, lightweight trekking trousers and wicking (non-cotton) shirts. Long trousers are recommended to act as sun protection. Shorts can also be worn on the initial few days of the road trip and for walks around BC and to Pumori as the temperature can be warm. Ensure that you apply sun protection frequently. Sunglasses are worn for most of the trek as well as sunhats.

The prevailing conditions on the trek will dictate what you will wear: if it is cold when you leave the camp in the morning for a trek around BC, then wear your base layer plus soft-shell. As things warm up take advantage of the zipper system which most trekking clothing have and open and/or close the zips to adjust to your own preferred temperature. If you get too warm then take a layer off.

Waterproofs are needed on hand especially during the acclimatisation phase of the expedition. Mount Everest creates its own weather system. It is not unusual to be caught out in an afternoon snowstorm low down on the mountain. Waterproofs should be Gortex material or similar and be carried with you at all times.

What do your guides and climbing Sherpa wear on summit day?

On summit day it gets cold and temperatures of -30C are not unusual. Typically, our guides wear 2 sets of base layers (long johns), a fleece mid layer (top and bottom) and thin down jacket on the torso. Over the top of this they wear a one piece down suit. To further ward of the wind chill a wind suit (thin Gortex shell) could be considered.

On their hands they’ll wear a thin layer of fleece or silk gloves over which a thicker set of gloves are worn. Over the top of these two layers a large set of mittens (down recommended) is worn. Hand warmers inside the mittens are also recommended.

Their heads are covered by a thermal “beanie” hat or a thick balaclava and the hood of their down jackets. On their feet the guides wear one thin sock and one thick sock. Foot warmers recommended.

Over the top of your clothing you will wear a climbing harness and you will be attached to a rope for high passes/summit day.

On summit day your guides will also wear snow goggles.

How much gear can I bring?

We pay for yak + porter transport for two 50lb duffels (1x trekking duffel which will travel with you and 1x climbing duffel which will go straight to base camp) this should be more than enough weight. If you want to bring more than this with you, you will be expected to pay for the excess weight.

This amount will include excess on the flight to Lukla and then be roughly $300/duffel each way to base camp beyond the two duffel allotments. Transport is getting more expensive every year so please leave the kitchen sink at home! (we already have those at base camp) Just bring what you need to be comfortable but not more than that.

How should I pack?

For the trip to base camp climbers will need to pack in two separate duffels: a base camp duffel and a trekking duffel. Climber’s base camp duffel will not be accessible while on the trek to Lobuche en route to base camp and should contain all of your climbing gear (crampons, axes, down suit etc) and items you won’t need until Lobuche.

 

Your trekking duffel will contain everything you will need for the trip to base camp including your trekking gear, rain gear, street clothes, and a light sleeping bag. Trekkers will have everything with them in one duffel. Please keep everything you will need with you such as medications and medical supplies. What will go in your trekking and base camp duffels will be covered in more detail in Kathmandu.

Pack an additional small lightweight duffel in your luggage to leave street, travel clothes and things you won’t need on the expedition at the hotel in Kathmandu.

How heavy will my pack be?

In general, climbing packs on Mt. Everest are relatively light. You will likely be carrying 15lbs – 30lbs (7kg – 12kg) most of the time while climbing and less on the trek into base camp. While climbing you should be prepared to carry your gear for the day and some of your personal gear for the mountain. Sherpa will carry all of the group gear and help with personal gear where possible.

Insurance & Travel

Will I need to purchase insurance?

Yes, trip insurance is required for this program and it needs to cover the entire cost of the trip and include trip cancellation, trip interruption, medical expenses, repatriation, and evacuation for the entire length of the expedition.

Trekkers are required to have the same coverage. Unforeseen hiccups are part of adventure travel both before and during the expedition and it can be very expensive. Every effort should be taken to account for them in advance. Please forward a copy of your insurance for our records so that we can help you in the event that it need to be used during the expedition. Most insurers require us to contact them immediately.

If you require more help, please contact 360 Expeditions

Can you arrange a helicopter flight from Everest Base Camp to Lukla / Kathmandu?

Many say that one of the best experiences of their entire expedition is taking a helicopter flight back down the Khumbu Valley and getting an aerial view of the trek, the peaks they’ve been climbing and the mighty Himalayan range. It is, without doubt, one of the most scenic, adventurous mountain flights in the world.

Further, while people initially think they will want to undertake the 3 day, 40 mile trek back down the valley, we’ve found that after two long months on the mountain, the draw of civilisation, getting back to family and friends & enjoying that well-deserved beer can be irresistible.

We also have climbers who wish to drop down to lower altitudes part way through the expedition to supercharge their rest and recovery between rotations.

What are the helicopter options from Base Camp to Kathmandu?

One Way Helicopter from Base Camp to Lukla*$3,495 USD

A private helicopter from Everest base camp to Lukla avoids the three day, 40 mile walk back down the valley. From Lukla you will catch a regularly scheduled fixed-wing plane back to Kathmandu either that day or the following.
*or Lukla back to Base Camp mid expedition

One Way Helicopter from Base Camp to Kathmandu*: $5,995 USD

For those that aren’t as price sensitive and who want to get back to Kathmandu and homeward bound as quickly as possible at the end of the expedition, we can arrange a helicopter for you directly from Everest Base Camp to Kathmandu.
*or Kathmandu back to Base Camp mid expedition

What are the helicopter options from Kathmandu to Base Camp?

One Way Helicopter from Kathmandu to Lukla*$3,495 USD
If the fixed plane schedule does not suit you or the notorious weather in Lukla permits helicopter flights but not fixed-wing departures, you may elect to take a helicopter from Lukla airport back to Kathmandu or vice versa.

Please note: If you would like to include a helicopter option in your expedition please let us know BEFORE your trip so we can pre-book your flight in advance and include this in your trip total. If you decide to add a helicopter flight during your expedition, we cannot guarantee availability. Further arranging services from the mountain or at short notice attracts an additional service fee of $1000 All helicopter flights need to be paid in advance with no exceptions.

These options do not include Medical, Evacuation and Rescue helicopters which will be organized for you in liaison with your trip insurer in the event of an emergency – this is another reason why good coverage in your policy is essential.

Are there any entry or Visa requirements?

Often just getting to Nepal can be the hardest part. Once you’re on the ground it’s time to relax. Upon exiting the plane walk to the left of the customs area and have your passport, photo, money, and visa form handy. You must pay for your visa first at the desk straight ahead and to the left before getting in the “Visa Upon Entry” line (far left of the large room). Purchase the a 90 day for Everest and Lhotse climbers or the 30 day visa for trekkers and Lobuche climbers single entry Nepali visa.
http://www.nepalimmigration.gov.np/page/visa-on-arrival

What if we can't get into Lukla in time because of weather?

It’s good to remember that we are in the Himalaya and weather can be variable so it’s important to be patient. Generally, it’s no more than a day or two delay. If it looks like we’ll be unable to get in on the plane then we’ll look at hiring helicopters to get into a safe spot in the valley to stay on schedule.

Money

How much cash should I bring?

It is better to have more money than you need than not enough, while most things are covered on the trip once you land in Kathmandu (check what’s included/what’s not included list for details) you will still need cash.

Generally, we recommend bringing $2,000 – $3,000 USD plus a credit card to cover all potential expenses including an early departure but it is unlikely that you will need all of this.

The cash that you need to bring includes

  • money for visas ($100 for 1 single entry 90 day),
  • Sherpa tip pool ($600 for climbers and $300 for trekkers),
  • money for staff tips (customary but optional)
  • $200 for potential consultation and treatment by the doctors at base camp,
  • $500 to cover expenses for a potential early departure (not often, but sometimes this occurs)
  • $1,500 – $5,000 if you think you’ll want a helicopter ride out
  • $300 for miscellaneous expenses like non-group meals, shopping, drinks around Kathmandu and while on the trip to base camp if you want wifi, sodas, specialty coffees, bottled water, charging of devices or snacks (meals are covered),

Changing money & credit card

Small denominations (1’s, 5’s, 10’s and 20’s) are better and although American dollars are accepted, you can change money into Nepali rupees at change houses when you arrive. Rates are generally about the same and I’ve never encountered one that isn’t legitimate. Also, there are now quite a few ATM’s around town where you can use your card to take out local cash at a good rate. It is much more difficult to change money, especially large sums, once in the Khumbu Valley.

Please let your credit card company know you will be traveling so you can use your card (and not set off the fraud alert due to using the card in a foreign country).

In the Khumbu, what's not included?

We cover almost everything in the cost of the trip once we fly into the Khumbu valley so there shouldn’t be too many other expenses that you need to worry about. The biggest expense is tips.

The Sherpa tip pool is $600 and I will collect that at the beginning on the climb to disperse amongst the entire team at the end of the climb including cook staff and dining staff. People sometimes tip their individual summit Sherpa a bit more than this and it seems like people have been tipping their guide about 1k-2k on the Western Guided option. The other personal expenses people accrue are wifi (through third party operators) additional personal snacks, drinking, charging of devices & toilet paper. We suggest you bring a portable charger and pack a few additional rolls of toilet paper for the trek in.

Communications & Electronics

What about phones & wifi?

We suggest picking up a local Ncell sim card in Kathmandu with a data package. Signal is reliable in Kathmandu & for most of the trek up the Khumbu valley it is strong enough to support both calls and data. Once you get to base camp cell service becomes unreliable, although it can sometimes pick up a low signal (not enough to support data). You can buy a local Ncell sim card in Kathmandu and there is a Ncell store close to our hotel that we are happy to show. Your phone will need to be unlocked and you will need your passport to get a sim card. You can get recharge cards almost anywhere. This is by far the most affordable way of staying connected and getting data in the Khumbu valley up until base camp.

If you’d like to use your own sim card, talk to your provider about activating your international roaming and you should be able to tie into the local networks.

At base camp, when the cell service runs out, you can connect to the wifi network and make calls on facetime, Whatsapp, FB, or Skype. It is available for individual purchase which means you only pay for what you use. Please note, this is operated by a third party and we have no control over whether it works or the expense. There are also internet cafes in the bigger towns along the route to base camp to get online and third-party wifi available for purchase in most of the teahouses.

Please keep devices like laptops, smartphones and iPads waterproofed in your trekking packs so they don’t break in your duffels. You will be responsible for your own valuables.

Do we have access to a satellite phone?

There will be a satellite phone with the team but we don’t expect to use it until above base camp. It can be made available to team members at $3/minute. If you plan on bringing your own satellite phone with you, you are required to register it with Nepal which costs thousands of dollars. Should you choose not to register it and use it anyway, you do so at your own risk.

What about charging?

Given the local expense of electricity, teahouses charge you to repower and recharge your electronic devices en route to base camp. This tends to get more expensive up the valley and a portable battery pack is a good idea. You will need to bring an adapter. This cost is your own expense.

Once at Base Camp we will have power and power cords that fit North American plugs. Charging is dependent upon the sun or fuel for the generator so it won’t be available all the time but we will try to make it available enough to meet your needs.

Everest, the Grand Dame of all mountains.  She’s a tough mountain both physically and mentally but well worth the short term pain for long term euphoria of knowing you stood on top of the world.

Jo Bradshaw, Everest South Col
More Testimonials

Road to Everest

Read Blog